Investing is serious business. On a lighter note, here is a list of market maxims that have been around for years and represent thoughts on investing from a variety of sources. Use at your discretion!

    • Buy low sell high.
    • Never marry your investments.
    • Cut your losses, let your profit ride.
    • The bulls make money, the bears make money, but the hogs lose.
    • Don’t wait for the top or the bottom, profit in between.
    • Discretion given is control lost.
    • Don’t put all your eggs in one basket – or put all your eggs in one basket and watch the basket.
    • The market is most dangerous at its best and at its best when at its worst.
    • People who can’t afford to lose shouldn’t play the market.
    • It stocks don’t rise … they’ll decline.
    • A small real loss often prevents a large paper one.
    • A well bought stock is half sold.
    • No one knows for sure which way the market will go. If they did they would tell no one, and be content to reap their own fortune!
    • Don’t go short stocks you can’t cover or don’t sell short today, stocks you can’t borrow tomorrow.
    • Buy on the rumour, sell on the news.
    • Never reach for stocks – like trains there will be another one along.
    • A fool and his money are soon parted in life and in the market.
    • Stocks, like children, need watching.
    • Be guided in investment by reason not rumour.
    • Never wait for the extra eighth.
    • It takes more intelligence to profit from good advice than to give it.
    • Every stock market has its day, don’t overstay it.
    • Tips are only as good as the source.
    • Ask yourself, “why am I being tipped?”
    • The best way to go broke is on inside advice and information.
    • Share prices fluctuate more widely than share values.
    • Good stocks recover, cats and dogs die.
    • Scared money never makes any money.

This information is provided as an information service only and is not intended to substitute for competent professional advice. No action should be initiated without consulting a professional advisor.

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